Heart Rhythm Institute

Posted on March 15th, 2017
An electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) is a common tool used to diagnosis and assess heart conditions. It’s a road map of the electrical activity in the heart that a physician can follow to see what is or isn’t working properly.  The ECG can present different patterns, but the more important use is identifying why a certain pattern has developed. At the Oklahoma Heart Hospital, ECGs... Read More
Posted on March 3rd, 2017
SVT (supraventricular tachycardia) is a general classification of heart rhythm issues that occur in the upper part of the heart (the atria). As with other heart rhythms, SVTs occur because of a disruption in the heart’s normal electrical rhythm. Symptoms may include heart palpitations, light-headedness, dizziness, shortness of breath, fatigue, or passing out.  Atrial fibrillation (AFib... Read More
Posted on February 15th, 2017
While heart attacks (myocardial infarction) and cardiac arrest sometimes go hand-in-hand, they are two distinctly different events in the heart. A heart attack is damage to the heart tissue due to a loss of blood flow to the heart. During cardiac arrest, the heart stops beating suddenly. Chances of surviving cardiac arrest are much lower — fewer than 1 in 10 people survive to leave the... Read More
Posted on February 3rd, 2017
A heart attack, or a myocardial infarction, is damage to the heart tissue that results from restricted blood flow (oxygen) to the heart. Heart attacks can be caused by a number of things, including fatty deposits (or plaque) in the coronary artery, blood clots from other parts of the body, a spasm of the coronary artery, abnormal heart rhythms that change the oxygen demand, or blood pressure that... Read More
Posted on January 16th, 2017
Wander down the center aisle of any grocery store, and you’ll be amazed at the number of number of claims on the front of those boxes. Now with 50% less fat! Reduced sugar! Low sodium! Sometimes those claims can be helpful, but it’s important to understand the role the carbohydrates (which includes sugar), protein, fat, and sodium play in overall nutrition.  Carbohydrates Most... Read More
Posted on January 3rd, 2017
As the calendar turns to a new year, many people reflect on the past year and set goals or resolutions for the coming year. Weight loss is a common theme this time of year, as people resolve to improve their eating habits and get more exercise.  The Oklahoma Heart Hospital has a team of nutritionists on staff to help patients make the dietary changes necessary for both weight loss and heart... Read More
Posted on December 5th, 2016
In November, physicians at the Heart Rhythm Institute at the Oklahoma Heart Hospital became the first in the state of Oklahoma to use His-bundle pacing (HBP).  His-bundle pacing uses the same pacemaker as in a typical pacemaker placement, but utilizes a specialized screw-in lead placed in the His bundle rather than in the right ventricle. The His bundle is a bundle of cardiac fibers... Read More
Posted on November 16th, 2016
Most people are aware that being overweight increases the risk for health problems, including heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, and more. But what exactly is happening in the body that increases that risk? And what steps can you take to reduce your overall risk?   The percentage of adults in America who are overweight or obese has continued to rise in recent years with... Read More
Posted on November 6th, 2016
Obesity rates in the United States continue to increase with about 35% of adults now classified as obese according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Obesity increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer. Obesity also increases the risk of atrial fibrillation, a type of irregular heart rhythm. While AFib on its own is not generally a life... Read More
Posted on October 15th, 2016
Atrial fibrillation or AFib is a specific type of arrhythmia that occurs in the top chambers of the heart. Symptoms may include heart palpitations, shortness of breath, fatigue, light headedness, dizziness, and sometimes passing out. AFib on its own is not generally life threatening, but patients with AFib do have a higher risk of stroke than the average population. When assessing a patient... Read More

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